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Press Release: Shell to Sea respond to Shatter's replacement as Minister for Justice

By: 
Shell to Sea

Shell to Sea notes the resignation of Alan Shatter and his replacement by Frances Fitzgerald as Minister for Justice as a long overdue development. Terence Conway, Shell to Sea spokesperson, says “Alan Shatter showed contempt for everybody who raised issues of wrongdoing in an Garda Siochána and it was clear he never had any intention of dealing with institutional corruption in the Gardaí. We ask that his successor takes immediate action to deal with the blatant abuses of power that, unfortunately, are rampant within the force.”

 

While Mr Shatter came under strong criticism for his handling of the Garda whistleblowers, the bugging of GSOC's offices and the penalty points controversy, his refusal to consider any investigation of Garda policies, tactics and procedures in relation to the policing of the Shell/Corrib dispute was nothing short of beligerent. Not only did Minister Shatter rebuke every call for an inquiry into the Gardaí in relation to this matter, he also engaged in a hostile campaign to discredit the legitimate protests that have taken place in north Mayo since 2002, consistently refering to “protest tourism” and attempting to obscure the fact that opposition to Shell/Corrib stems first and foremost from local residents who have never been properly consulted nor given their consent for the imposition of a massive industrial project in the heart of their community.

Posted Date: 
8 May 2014

Mick Wallace and Clare Daly Question Shatter about Policing of Corrib

By: 
Shell to Sea

Mick Wallace and Clare Daly invite Justice Minister Alan Shatter to initiate an independent inquiry into the policing  of Corrib - his response? He could purchase twice as many vehicles for the Gardaí if there were no protests! Minister Shatter also tries to imply that GSOC have chosen not to initiate an investigation into practices, policies and procedures of policing Corrib - when in fact under current legislation ministerial permission is required for such a "106" investigation and this is something which no Minister for Justice has ever given...

 

Deputies Daly and Wallace also question Minister Shatter about the investigations into the alleged deliveries of alcohol to Belmullet Garda station.

Posted Date: 
6 May 2014

Fund:it - Atlantic

By: 
Risteard O Domhnaill

Atlantic’ is the latest documentary film from the makers of the award winning documentary, ‘The Pipe’. ‘Atlantic’ follows the fortunes of three fishing communities united and divided by the Atlantic ocean, as they struggle to maintain their way of life despite mounting challenges within their own industry and environment, and an increase of oil exploration activities in their fishing grounds. 

On both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, new hydrocarbon frontiers are moving out into deeper water, and further north into the Arctic, pushing the boundaries of risk and technology in the race for the last great oil fields. 

The film will chart the politics of resource management of the North Atlantic; from strong State control in Norway, mixed fortunes in Newfoundland, to a more liberal, privatised system in Ireland. 

Posted Date: 
1 May 2014

Shell to Sea goes to UN over policing of gas dispute

By: 
Lorna Siggins - Irish Times

Environmental group makes the submission after Alan Shatter declines to hold independent inquiry

Shell to Sea has appealed to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) to raise the issue of policing the Corrib gas dispute with the Government.

The Mayo-based environmental group says it has made the submission to the UNHCR’s office, following Minister for Justice Alan Shatter’s confirmation in the Dáil that he did “not see a necessity” for an independent inquiry into policing in North Mayo.

UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights Defenders Margaret Sekaggya had recommended that the Government should “investigate all allegations and reports of intimidation, harassment and surveillance in the context of the Corrib gas dispute in a prompt and impartial manner”.

In a report submitted to the UN Human Rights Council early last year, Ms Sekaggya also advised that the Government permit the Garda Ombudsman to conduct an “examination of the practices, policies and procedures of the police in the context of the Corrib gas dispute” and enact “overarching legislation to protect whistle-blowers in all sectors of activity, ensuring that it complies fully with the United Nations Convention against Corruption”.

Posted Date: 
1 May 2014

News Release - Government Rejects UN Rapporteur's Recommendations on Corrib

By: 
Shell to Sea
News Release - Issued by Mayo Shell to Sea
April 30th, 2014 - For immediate release

In a submission to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Shell to Sea have criticised the Irish Government for rejecting recommendations made by the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights regarding the policing of Corrib protest [1].

In a report submitted to the UN Human Rights Council in March 2013, the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights Defenders Margaret Sekaggya, called on the Irish Government to “Investigate all allegation and reports of intimidation, harassment and surveillance in the context of the Corrib Gas dispute in a prompt and impartial manner” [2].

Ms Sekaggya met with Shell to Sea, Table Observers and other concerned members of the community in November 2012

 
Ms Sekaggya's recommendations were echoed earlier this year by Archbishop Desmond Tutu who supported the call for an independent inquiry into the policing of Corrib [3].

However earlier this month Minister for Justice Alan Shatter rejected the recommendation saying “I do not see a necessity for an independent inquiry into the policing operation in north County Mayo.”[4]

 

Other relevant recommendations made by Rapporteur Sekeggya, including  allowing the Garda Ombudsman to do an “examination of the practices, policies and procedures of the police in the context of the Corrib Gas dispute” also have been ignored by the Irish Government.

Posted Date: 
30 April 2014
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